ORANGE DRAPERY PANELS - DRAPERY PANELS


Orange drapery panels - King canopy frame.



Orange Drapery Panels





orange drapery panels






    drapery
  • cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds

  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds

  • curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)

  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting

  • Drapery is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French drap, from Late Latin drappus ). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes - such as around windows - or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers.

  • Long curtains of heavy fabric





    orange
  • any citrus tree bearing oranges

  • A round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind

  • of the color between red and yellow; similar to the color of a ripe orange

  • A drink made from or flavored with orange

  • The leathery-leaved evergreen tree that bears this fruit, native to warm regions of south and Southeast Asia. Oranges are a major commercial crop in many warm regions of the world

  • round yellow to orange fruit of any of several citrus trees





    panels
  • A thin, typically rectangular piece of wood or glass forming or set into the surface of a door, wall, or ceiling

  • (panel) sheet that forms a distinct (usually flat and rectangular) section or component of something

  • (panel) empanel: select from a list; "empanel prospective jurors"

  • A thin piece of metal forming part of the outer shell of a vehicle

  • A flat board on which instruments or controls are fixed

  • (panel) decorate with panels; "panel the walls with wood"











(Former) Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company




(Former) Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company





Downtown Brooklyn

The Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company, built in 1929-30, is a masterful example of the series of tall structures issuing from architect Ralph Walker’s long and productive association with the communications industry.

Walker was a prominent New York architect whose expressive tall buildings, prolific writings and professional leadership made him one of the foremost representatives of his field during his long life. In this dramatically-massed, orange brick skyscraper, Walker illustrates his exceptional ability to apply the Art Deco style to a large office tower. Its abstract, metal ornament on the ground story display windows and the main entrance on Bridge Street, suggests constant movement, and is typical of the art of late 1920s.

The structure is faced with multiple sizes of brick, laid in a variety of patterns and planes to create a rich facade design. Horizontal panels of patterned brick enhance each setback leading to the central tower. At the same time, the verticality of the structure is emphasised by narrow sections of facade that soar upward, above others, and by the way the brick is laid to create undulating vertical planes suggestive of draperies. Through his series of telephone company buildings, many of Walker=s design ideas evolved so that here he achieved a tremendous sense of harmony and refinement in his use of brick and metalwork, as well as in the overall massing.

The location of this large, important structure in downtown Brooklyn emphasized the commitment of New York Telephone Company to the growth and advancement of the most modern telephone service to the expanding area of Brooklyn and Long Island. In this Long Island Headquarters Building Walker was able to apply the Art Deco style and create a skyscraper which met the technological needs of the client and the demands of the New York City Building Code.

The Long Island Headquarters Building was constructed to provide central offices for the growing telephone service needs of Brooklyn and Long Island. Twenty-seven stories tall, with its long side facing Bridge Street, this building replaced twelve smaller buildings on the site. Its existence allowed the consolidation to one location of approximately 3,500 employees from a variety of other offices.

Walker used many of the same ideas on this building that he had employed on other telephone company buildings, but here there is a greater refinement and harmony due to his earlier design experiences. The narrow tower rising from a broad base was a similar arrangement to the other structures, reflecting the requirements of the recent zoning law. In this Brooklyn building, Walker was able to make the transition from broad to narrow in a particularly well-integrated manner, by allowing parts of some sections to continue to rise while others stepped back. Although symmetrical, the setbacks appear to be more irregular and the eye is led up the facade without any strong breaks.

The primary ornamentation on this building comes from the manner in which the bricks are laid. The sense of vertical movement created by the setbacks is reinforced by the masterful bricklaying in the central section of the two main facades. The brick is placed to create varied planes in an undulating effect, as if it were folds of cloth, reflecting Walker=s sense of the wall as a curtain enclosing the steel structure. This three dimensional appearance adds variety and interest to the central parts of the facades, while emphasizing the vertical, as it continues through the numerous setbacks. Beyond the center sections, the smaller bricks used to face the rest of the ground story are set in a stacked, header bond so that their square ends face the front.

The slight variation of colors here and the small-scale patterns enhance the texture of the facade. This is further emphasized by the distinctive brick course at each sill and lintel level which is a composed of rectangular header bricks, and which circumscribe the side sections of the building horizontally. Further virtuosity in the brickwork is seen at the parapets which mark each setback and in the areas surrounding the secondary entrances.

The entrances are framed by stepped brickwork with intertwined horizontal and vertical projections, again suggesting woven material, in further homage to the German Expressionists. Each parapet is distinguished by a variety of projecting horizontal and vertical shapes as well, but here they appear less intertwined. The shadows produced by the projections and the irregular top edges, which are finished with cast stone caps, provide a distinctive finish for the setback sections.

As Walker’s ability to fully exploit his primary material evolved, he made a more limited use of other materials. On this building only the ground story windows and the main entrance on Bridge Street are enhanced by metal open-work screens. The abstract ornament that frames each window has an effect of li











(Former) Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company




(Former) Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company





Downtown Brooklyn

Downtown Brooklyn

The Long Island Headquarters of the New York Telephone Company, built in 1929-30, is a masterful example of the series of tall structures issuing from architect Ralph Walker’s long and productive association with the communications industry.

Walker was a prominent New York architect whose expressive tall buildings, prolific writings and professional leadership made him one of the foremost representatives of his field during his long life. In this dramatically-massed, orange brick skyscraper, Walker illustrates his exceptional ability to apply the Art Deco style to a large office tower. Its abstract, metal ornament on the ground story display windows and the main entrance on Bridge Street, suggests constant movement, and is typical of the art of late 1920s.

The structure is faced with multiple sizes of brick, laid in a variety of patterns and planes to create a rich facade design. Horizontal panels of patterned brick enhance each setback leading to the central tower. At the same time, the verticality of the structure is emphasised by narrow sections of facade that soar upward, above others, and by the way the brick is laid to create undulating vertical planes suggestive of draperies. Through his series of telephone company buildings, many of Walker=s design ideas evolved so that here he achieved a tremendous sense of harmony and refinement in his use of brick and metalwork, as well as in the overall massing.

The location of this large, important structure in downtown Brooklyn emphasized the commitment of New York Telephone Company to the growth and advancement of the most modern telephone service to the expanding area of Brooklyn and Long Island. In this Long Island Headquarters Building Walker was able to apply the Art Deco style and create a skyscraper which met the technological needs of the client and the demands of the New York City Building Code.

The Long Island Headquarters Building was constructed to provide central offices for the growing telephone service needs of Brooklyn and Long Island. Twenty-seven stories tall, with its long side facing Bridge Street, this building replaced twelve smaller buildings on the site. Its existence allowed the consolidation to one location of approximately 3,500 employees from a variety of other offices.

Walker used many of the same ideas on this building that he had employed on other telephone company buildings, but here there is a greater refinement and harmony due to his earlier design experiences. The narrow tower rising from a broad base was a similar arrangement to the other structures, reflecting the requirements of the recent zoning law. In this Brooklyn building, Walker was able to make the transition from broad to narrow in a particularly well-integrated manner, by allowing parts of some sections to continue to rise while others stepped back. Although symmetrical, the setbacks appear to be more irregular and the eye is led up the facade without any strong breaks.

The primary ornamentation on this building comes from the manner in which the bricks are laid. The sense of vertical movement created by the setbacks is reinforced by the masterful bricklaying in the central section of the two main facades. The brick is placed to create varied planes in an undulating effect, as if it were folds of cloth, reflecting Walker=s sense of the wall as a curtain enclosing the steel structure. This three dimensional appearance adds variety and interest to the central parts of the facades, while emphasizing the vertical, as it continues through the numerous setbacks. Beyond the center sections, the smaller bricks used to face the rest of the ground story are set in a stacked, header bond so that their square ends face the front.

The slight variation of colors here and the small-scale patterns enhance the texture of the facade. This is further emphasized by the distinctive brick course at each sill and lintel level which is a composed of rectangular header bricks, and which circumscribe the side sections of the building horizontally. Further virtuosity in the brickwork is seen at the parapets which mark each setback and in the areas surrounding the secondary entrances.

The entrances are framed by stepped brickwork with intertwined horizontal and vertical projections, again suggesting woven material, in further homage to the German Expressionists. Each parapet is distinguished by a variety of projecting horizontal and vertical shapes as well, but here they appear less intertwined. The shadows produced by the projections and the irregular top edges, which are finished with cast stone caps, provide a distinctive finish for the setback sections.

As Walker’s ability to fully exploit his primary material evolved, he made a more limited use of other materials. On this building only the ground story windows and the main entrance on Bridge Street are enhanced by metal open-work screens. The abstract ornament that frames each window









orange drapery panels







Similar posts:

barrons awnings

auburn hair shades

how to paint glass lamp shades

brown window drapes

installation of blinds

shutters photo

tent awning canvas

car shade cover



tag : orange drapery panels white panel download windows blinds 6

Comments

Private comment